How to plan your study program

We advise you to take 5-6 courses per semester (or the equivalent of roughly 28 credits) in your first three semesters, so that you can focus on the Master thesis and the final exam in your fourth semester.  

In the first semester, you should take at least one lecture course (with exercises) and one or two seminars as obligatory courses. If you start in Fall and do not have enough background in logic, you should take a logic course as free elective. Alternatively (or in addition) you might take the course English for philosophy students, if you need to brush up your English and develop your writing skills. You may also take German language courses, but only courses above level C1 will count for credit as free electives. Also, you should take the colloquium seminar (if you start in fall), or the colloquium seminar and the Master seminar (if you start in spring).  

In your second semester, you should take two seminars as obligatory courses. As free electives, you may take either a lecture course with exercises and another seminar, or two more seminars, or any other course at the MA-level, including courses at other departments or other universities. Also, you may consider taking again the colloquium seminar and/or the Master seminar.  

In the third semester you should complete your coursework as far as possible. You may need to take another lecture course (if you have taken only one as obligatory course so far), and two more seminars to reach the total of six obligatory seminars. You should also see to it that you reach the total of 24 credits in free electives by taking either a further lecture course, a seminar, a colloquium seminar or a Master seminar. During the third semester you should choose the supervisor of your Master thesis and start thinking about a topic you would like to write on for your thesis.  

In the fourth semester, you should write your Master thesis and prepare for the final exam. In connection with writing your thesis, you may find it helpful to attend another Masters seminar. In preparing for the final exam, you need to choose two topics, one of which must be related to your thesis. The exam (with your supervisor and a second examiner) can take place at the earliest two weeks after your thesis has been approved.  

Going abroad in an Erasmus program  

While a Master student in Salzburg, you may spend one or two semesters at another university as an exchange student within the Master program. The Department of Philosophy has the following Erasmus partnerships. Courses offered in English: University of Barcelona, University of Groningen, University of Stockholm, University of Turin. Courses offered in German: University of Düsseldorf, University of Hamburg, University of Konstanz and University of Zürich. In the context of the Erasmus programme you will receive an Erasmus scholarship which usually is between 300 and 600 Euro monthly (depending on the place you are going to). If you would like to have further information about the Erasmus partnerships, please get in touch with: kathrin.hommel(at)sbg.ac.at.

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