Anders Nes

Strong Phenomenal Intentionality versus the Holism of Non-Demonstrative Inference

Diverse contemporary philosophers of mind follow Brentano in affirming a close connection between intentionality and consciousness. An influential subset of such philosophers, including such naturalists as Tye, Dretske, and Lycan, seek to explain (phenomenal) consciousness in terms of notions of intentionality they see as prior to, and independent of, consciousness. However, recently, a converse (and surely more Brentanian) approach has been gathering steam, according to which the notion of intentionality is at least coeval with that of consciousness, an approach lately dubbed the ‘Phenomenal Intentionality Research Programme’ (Krigel forthcoming) What I term ‘Strong Phenomenal Intentionality’ (SPI) holds all intentional states to be phenomenally conscious (a view defended by Georgalis 2006 and Strawson 2008), or, if they are not phenomenally conscious, to exemplify ‘second-class’ forms of intentionality, in that they are interpretation-dependent (Kriegel 2011), somehow inferential shadows of phenomenal states (Horgan and Graham forthcoming), or derivative in some other way upon phenomenal states. (See Kriegel forthcoming: 19-20 for discussion). SPI, I shall argue, confronts a challenge over the holistic character of non-demonstrative inference. The reasonability of most of our inferences, in both theoretical and practical reasoning, depends on vast tracts of background knowledge, or background assumptions. This is brought out in what Carnap (1950), Hempel (1960), and most subsequent theorists of non-deductive reasoning have accepted under the name of the ‘Requirement of Total Evidence’ (RTE). As T. Kelly (2006) recently has put it: “In order to be justified in believing some proposition then, it is not enough that that proposition be well-supported by some proper subset of one´s total evidence; rather, what is relevant is how well-supported the proposition is by one´s total evidence.” Fodor´s (1983) discussion of the holistic, apparently unencapsulated nature of belief fixation touches on closely related themes. On plausible assumptions about what it takes for some evidence to be available to some subject (and so be part of her total evidence), SPI in conjunction with RTE implies that the reasonability of a non-demonstrative inference is relative, at most, to the totality of the phenomenally conscious states of the subject, or, in so far as there are exceptions to this, that these exceptions are due to second-class intentional states. This implication, I argue, is not plausible. The reasonability of our non-demonstrative inferences pervasively depends on vast stocks of knowledge or belief that is merely preconscious, in the Freudian sense, or access but not phenomenally conscious, in Block’s (1995).

For example, suppose I´m walking past a café in Salzburg, and decide to walk in and order a cappuccino. In making this decision, I assumed the café had a floor to walk on, that it serves cappuccinos safe for human consumption, that the people behind the counter would treat me with a minimum of respect and so, e.g., not attack me but serve me, etc. etc. If I didn’t assume this, my forming of this intention would be quite unreasonable. However, it is not plausible to think that all of these assumptions somehow figured in my overall, occurrent phenomenally conscious state of mind at the time prior to entering. It might well be that, what was occupying my conscious awareness prior to forming my decision, were thoughts of the pleasures and benefits of getting a cappuccino, of the attractive woodwork on the walls and ceiling (as seen though the windows), some hopeful musings that some members of Camerata Salzburg (of which I´m a fan) surely must be regulars at a place like this, and some other vague reflections related to my touristy, stereotyped conception of Salzburg. If asked ’what was your mind´ immediately after making my decision, these are the things that would spring to my self-awareness. True, if asked ´Did you assume this café to have a floor safe to walk on?’ I would naturally reply ´Yes, of course´. But my grounds for affirming this question would be different in kind from my grounds for affirming ´Were you supposing this place would be quite likely to be frequented by members of the Camerata?’ The latter I could affirm because of some sort of vivid memory; the question about my assumption about the floor, in constrast, I answer in some different way. Drawing on Bretano´s (1874/1973: 22-27) discussion of ´inner perception´ and its relation to memory, I argue this is evidence that my background assumptions about the floor etc. (in contrast to my thoughts about the woodwork, the Camerata, etc.) are not phenomenal states.

These considerations do not, as they stand, disprove the more qualified form of SPI according to which I do have the alleged, non-phenomenal background assumptions, but that these are somehow second-class examples of intentionality. I end by arguing against some versions of this qualified form of SPI, notably the construal of such states as interpretation-dependent, proposed by Kriegel (2011). I note that this view has the implication that the reasonability of my (phenomenally conscious) decision to visit the cafe is also an interpretation-dependent matter. If so, the power of this phenomenal state to make other intentional states reasonable – for example, leading me to form a decision to find the entrance – is also interpretation-dependent. These implications are not attractive, I argue. Moreover, at least some of the non-phenomenal background assumptions play as causal role in making me form the relevant intention, and do so in a content-sensitive way. By appeal to the classical Cartesian idea that there can be no less reality in the cause than in the effect, I conclude we should not take an interpretationist – and so, in broad terms, a projectivist – view of such non-phenomenal states, if we do not take if of such phenomenally conscious intentional states as my decision to visit the cafe. Brentano, F. (1874/1973) Psychology from Empirical Standpoint . Edited by O. Kraus. English edition L. L. McAlister, ed. Translated by A. C. Rancurello, D. B. Terrell, and L. L. McAlister. Routledge. Carnap, R. (1950) The Logical Foundations of Probability. Chicago University Press. Georgalis , N . (2006) The Primacy of the Subjective . Cambridge MA : MIT Press . Hempel, C. (1960). “Inductive Inconsistencies”, Synthese 12: 439-469. Horgan , T . and G. Graham Forthcoming . “Phenomenal Intentionality and Content Determinacy.” In R. Schantz , Prospects for Meaning . Amsterdam : de Gruyter. Kriegel, U. (2011) The Sources of Intentionality. OUP. Kriegel, U. (forthcoming) "The Phenomenal Intentionality Research Program", Phenomenal Intentionality: New Essays, OUP. Accessed from <http://uriahkriegel.com/downloads/PIRP.pdf>, 1.12.2012 Strawson , G . 2008 . “Real Intentionality 3: Why Intentionality Entails Consciousness.” In his Real Materialism and Other Essays . OUP.

  • ENGLISH English
  • News
    Das Paper "The disabling effect of enabling social policies on organizational career management" von Astrid Reichel (Professorin für Human Resource Management an der PLUS) et al. wurde beim Academy of Management Meeting 2019, der mit über 10.000 TeilnehmerInnen weltweit größten und wichtigsten Management Konferenz, mit dem Emerald Best International Symposium Award ausgezeichnet.
    Univ.Doz. Dr. Dr.h.c. Jasmine Dum-Tragut erhielt die Medaille am 31. Oktober im Rahmen der Schlussveranstaltung der von ihr kuratierten Ausstellung "Fernab der Heimat - in der Heimat Schicksale armenischer Kriegsgefangener im Ersten Weltkrieg" am Genozid-Museum-Institut in Jerevan/Armenien.
    Die Salzburger Historikerin Christina Antenhofer wurde kürzlich zum Mitglied der Europäischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und Künste (Historische Klasse) ernannt.
    Zum Windersemester 2019/20 berief die Universität Salzburg fünf neue UniversitätsprofessorInnen: Michael BLAUBERGER, Politik der Europäischen Union, Politikwissenschaft und Soziologie (+ DZ SCEUS), Alexander SOKOLICEK, Klassische Archäologie, Altertumswissenschaften, Ulrike GREINER, Professionsforschung und LehrerInnenbildung unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Fachdidaktiken, School of Education, Margit REITER, Europäische Zeitgeschichte.
    Sozialpädagogik zwischen Hilfe, Kontrolle, Strafe und Zwang
    Vom 5. bis 22. November 2019 lädt Südwind in Zusammenarbeit mit der Universität Salzburg ExpertInnen zum Thema globale Ungleichheiten ein und bietet ein vielfältiges Programm: 13 Veranstaltungen der Reihe "REDUCE INEQUALITIES global denken - nachhaltig handeln" setzen sich aus verschiedenen Perspektiven mit globalen Fragen und deren Wechselwirkung mit der lokalen und individuellen Ebene auseinander.
    Eine internationale Tagung, 13.–15. November 2019, veranstaltet von SALZBURG MUSEUM und UNIVERSITÄT SALZBURG, Tagungsleitung: Univ.-Prof. Dr. Christoph Kühberger
    Am: 14.11.2019 // Zeit: 18:30h s.t. - 20:00h // Ort: Hörsaal 207 der Rechtswiss. Fakultät der Universität Salzburg // Churfürststraße 1 // A-5020 Salzburg // (Zugang beschildert)
    Priv.-Doz. Dr. Matthias Kropf hält am 15. November 2019 um 14 Uhr im HS 421 der Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, einen Gastvortrag zum Thema "Phylogeographical Studies of selected Steppe Plants in the Pannonian and Western Pontic Region". Der Fachbereich Biowissenschaften lädt herzlich dazu ein!
    Margit Reiter, seit WS 2019 neue Professorin für Europäische Zeitgeschichte am Fachbereich Geschichte präsentiert am 20. November ihr neues Buch "Die Ehemaligen" im HS 381, GesWi, Rudolfskai 42.
    DONNERSTAG, 21.11.: VORTRÄGE (8.30-19.00h) bei Wissenschaft & Kunst, Bergstr. 12a, KunstQuartier, Atelier 1.OG // FREITAG, 22.11.: EXKURSION (8.30-16.00h) Gedenkstätte Konzentrationslager Ebensee, Gedenkstätte Mauthausen. Abfahrt: 8.30 Uhr Unipark Nonntal, Erzabt-Klotz-Straße 1
    Die jährlich stattfindende interdisziplinäre Fachtagung des Wissensnetzwerks Recht, Wirtschaft und Arbeitswelt findet dieses Jahr am Donnerstag, 21.11.2019, zum Thema "Die Arbeit ist immer und überall - Mobiles Arbeiten und seine Folgen" auf der Edmundsburg statt.
    Der FB KoWi lädt Sie sehr herzlich zum Gastvortrag zum Thema How News Use is Changing Across the World - Vortrag von Dr. Richard Fletcher – Reuters Institute, University of Oxford .
    Im Rahmen der Vortragsreihe Geschichte im Gespräch sowie der Vorlesung "Grundlagen der Mittelalterlichen Geschichte (Christina Antenhofer)" hält Thorsten Hiltmann (Münster) am 26. November 2019 um 09 Uhr im HS 380 einen Vortrag zum Thema Mittelalterliche Heraldik zwischen Kulturgeschichte und neuen digitalen Methoden
    Der Fachbereich Slawistik möchte Sie zusammen mit dem Kulturzentrum DAS KINO sehr herzlich zum vierten Teil unserer erfolgreichen Kinoreihe der ost- und mittelosteuropäischen Filme einladen. Im Rahmen des Filmklubs „Slawistyka, Slavistika, Cлавистика“ werden preisgekrönte aktuelle polnische, russische und tschechische Filme mit gesellschaftlicher und politischer Thematik gezeigt.
    28. bis 30. November 2019 - Unipark Nonntal, Erzabt-Klotz-Straße 1, 5020 Salzburg, Abteilung Musik- und Tanzwissenschaft, Tanzstudio, Raum 2.105, 2. OG
    Der Fachbereich Linguistik lädt alle Interessierten ein zur Teilnahme an der 45. Österreichische Linguistiktagung. Die Veranstaltung findet am 6. und 7.12.19 im Unipark Nonntal statt. Die Frist zur Registrierung zu den regulären Teilnahmegebühren in Höhe von 40 bzw. 15 Euro (für Studierende und taube TeilnehmerInnen) wurde bis zum 07.11.2019 verlängert.
  • Veranstaltungen
  • 13.11.19 Bestsellerautor Bernhard Aichner präsentiert seinen neuesten Thriller „DER FUND“
    14.11.19 Symposion "Wirtschaftliche Betrachtungsweise"
    14.11.19 Maibaum 4.0 – Unsere kulturelle Zukunft am Land
    14.11.19 Salzburger Museen und Sammlungen - Geschichte vor Ort. Geschichtsforschung und Geschichtsdarstellung im Salzburger Freilichtmuseum. Von einer Hausübertragung bis zur Dokumentation des frühen ländlichen Fremdenverkehrs in Salzburg
    14.11.19 Salzburger Juristische Gesellschaft
    14.11.19 Group Singing: Positive Intervention in the Lives of People with Parkinson’s / Positive Auswirkungen des Chorgesangs auf Patientinnen und Patienten mit Parkinson
    15.11.19 Symposion "Wirtschaftliche Betrachtungsweise"
    15.11.19 Group Singing: Positive Intervention in the Lives of People with Parkinson’s / Positive Auswirkungen des Chorgesangs auf Patientinnen und Patienten mit Parkinson
    15.11.19 Phylogeographical studies of selected steppe plants in the Pannonian and Western Pontic region
  • Alumni Club
  • PRESSE
  • Uni-Shop
  • VERANSTALTUNGSRÄUME
  • STELLENMARKT
  • Facebook-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Twitter-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Instagram-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Flickr-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Vimeo-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg