Anders Nes

Strong Phenomenal Intentionality versus the Holism of Non-Demonstrative Inference

Diverse contemporary philosophers of mind follow Brentano in affirming a close connection between intentionality and consciousness. An influential subset of such philosophers, including such naturalists as Tye, Dretske, and Lycan, seek to explain (phenomenal) consciousness in terms of notions of intentionality they see as prior to, and independent of, consciousness. However, recently, a converse (and surely more Brentanian) approach has been gathering steam, according to which the notion of intentionality is at least coeval with that of consciousness, an approach lately dubbed the ‘Phenomenal Intentionality Research Programme’ (Krigel forthcoming) What I term ‘Strong Phenomenal Intentionality’ (SPI) holds all intentional states to be phenomenally conscious (a view defended by Georgalis 2006 and Strawson 2008), or, if they are not phenomenally conscious, to exemplify ‘second-class’ forms of intentionality, in that they are interpretation-dependent (Kriegel 2011), somehow inferential shadows of phenomenal states (Horgan and Graham forthcoming), or derivative in some other way upon phenomenal states. (See Kriegel forthcoming: 19-20 for discussion). SPI, I shall argue, confronts a challenge over the holistic character of non-demonstrative inference. The reasonability of most of our inferences, in both theoretical and practical reasoning, depends on vast tracts of background knowledge, or background assumptions. This is brought out in what Carnap (1950), Hempel (1960), and most subsequent theorists of non-deductive reasoning have accepted under the name of the ‘Requirement of Total Evidence’ (RTE). As T. Kelly (2006) recently has put it: “In order to be justified in believing some proposition then, it is not enough that that proposition be well-supported by some proper subset of one´s total evidence; rather, what is relevant is how well-supported the proposition is by one´s total evidence.” Fodor´s (1983) discussion of the holistic, apparently unencapsulated nature of belief fixation touches on closely related themes. On plausible assumptions about what it takes for some evidence to be available to some subject (and so be part of her total evidence), SPI in conjunction with RTE implies that the reasonability of a non-demonstrative inference is relative, at most, to the totality of the phenomenally conscious states of the subject, or, in so far as there are exceptions to this, that these exceptions are due to second-class intentional states. This implication, I argue, is not plausible. The reasonability of our non-demonstrative inferences pervasively depends on vast stocks of knowledge or belief that is merely preconscious, in the Freudian sense, or access but not phenomenally conscious, in Block’s (1995).

For example, suppose I´m walking past a café in Salzburg, and decide to walk in and order a cappuccino. In making this decision, I assumed the café had a floor to walk on, that it serves cappuccinos safe for human consumption, that the people behind the counter would treat me with a minimum of respect and so, e.g., not attack me but serve me, etc. etc. If I didn’t assume this, my forming of this intention would be quite unreasonable. However, it is not plausible to think that all of these assumptions somehow figured in my overall, occurrent phenomenally conscious state of mind at the time prior to entering. It might well be that, what was occupying my conscious awareness prior to forming my decision, were thoughts of the pleasures and benefits of getting a cappuccino, of the attractive woodwork on the walls and ceiling (as seen though the windows), some hopeful musings that some members of Camerata Salzburg (of which I´m a fan) surely must be regulars at a place like this, and some other vague reflections related to my touristy, stereotyped conception of Salzburg. If asked ’what was your mind´ immediately after making my decision, these are the things that would spring to my self-awareness. True, if asked ´Did you assume this café to have a floor safe to walk on?’ I would naturally reply ´Yes, of course´. But my grounds for affirming this question would be different in kind from my grounds for affirming ´Were you supposing this place would be quite likely to be frequented by members of the Camerata?’ The latter I could affirm because of some sort of vivid memory; the question about my assumption about the floor, in constrast, I answer in some different way. Drawing on Bretano´s (1874/1973: 22-27) discussion of ´inner perception´ and its relation to memory, I argue this is evidence that my background assumptions about the floor etc. (in contrast to my thoughts about the woodwork, the Camerata, etc.) are not phenomenal states.

These considerations do not, as they stand, disprove the more qualified form of SPI according to which I do have the alleged, non-phenomenal background assumptions, but that these are somehow second-class examples of intentionality. I end by arguing against some versions of this qualified form of SPI, notably the construal of such states as interpretation-dependent, proposed by Kriegel (2011). I note that this view has the implication that the reasonability of my (phenomenally conscious) decision to visit the cafe is also an interpretation-dependent matter. If so, the power of this phenomenal state to make other intentional states reasonable – for example, leading me to form a decision to find the entrance – is also interpretation-dependent. These implications are not attractive, I argue. Moreover, at least some of the non-phenomenal background assumptions play as causal role in making me form the relevant intention, and do so in a content-sensitive way. By appeal to the classical Cartesian idea that there can be no less reality in the cause than in the effect, I conclude we should not take an interpretationist – and so, in broad terms, a projectivist – view of such non-phenomenal states, if we do not take if of such phenomenally conscious intentional states as my decision to visit the cafe. Brentano, F. (1874/1973) Psychology from Empirical Standpoint . Edited by O. Kraus. English edition L. L. McAlister, ed. Translated by A. C. Rancurello, D. B. Terrell, and L. L. McAlister. Routledge. Carnap, R. (1950) The Logical Foundations of Probability. Chicago University Press. Georgalis , N . (2006) The Primacy of the Subjective . Cambridge MA : MIT Press . Hempel, C. (1960). “Inductive Inconsistencies”, Synthese 12: 439-469. Horgan , T . and G. Graham Forthcoming . “Phenomenal Intentionality and Content Determinacy.” In R. Schantz , Prospects for Meaning . Amsterdam : de Gruyter. Kriegel, U. (2011) The Sources of Intentionality. OUP. Kriegel, U. (forthcoming) "The Phenomenal Intentionality Research Program", Phenomenal Intentionality: New Essays, OUP. Accessed from <http://uriahkriegel.com/downloads/PIRP.pdf>, 1.12.2012 Strawson , G . 2008 . “Real Intentionality 3: Why Intentionality Entails Consciousness.” In his Real Materialism and Other Essays . OUP.

  • ENGLISH English
  • News
    In der jüngsten Ausgabe von U-Multirank ist die Universität Salzburg mit den Fächern Biowissenschaften, Informatik und Mathematik vertreten. Bei einem Vergleich mit den anderen teilnehmenden Hochschulen können diese Fachbereiche vielfach sehr gute Platzierungen erreichen.
    Im aktuellen Ökonomen Ranking des deutschen Handelsblatts errang Universitätsprofessor Florian Huber (31) vom Salzburg Centre of European Union Studies (SCEUS) in der Reihung nach aktueller Forschungsleistung Platz 100 und im Ranking der Jungökonomen, bei der die gesamte Forschungsleistung der unter 40-Jährigen bewertet wird, den exzellenten 62. Platz.
    Die Orientierungsveranstaltungen für Erasmus- und Austauschstudierende, die im Wintersemester 2019/2020 an die Universität Salzburg kommen, finden im Zeitraum von Montag, 16. bis Freitag, 27. September 2019 statt.
    Am Dienstag, dem 1. Oktober 2019 findet um 17.15 Uhr im HS 3.348 (Unipark, 3. Stock, Fachbereich Romanistik) eine Info-Veranstaltung statt, die sich in erster Linie an alle Neuinskribierten des Masterstudiums richtet. Darüber hinaus sind aber auch alle anderen Studierenden des Fachs sowie sonstige Interessierte herzlich eingeladen.
    Für seine Verdienste um die Stadt Salzburg hat Bürgermeister Harry Preuner am Dienstag, 17. September 2019, dem scheidenden Rektor der Universität Salzburg, Prof. Heinrich Schmidinger, das Stadtsiegel in Gold verliehen.
    Die Universität Salzburg vergab in Kooperation mit der Kaiserschild-Stiftung erneut die Dr. Hans-Riegel-Fachpreise im Bundesland Salzburg, heuer im Gesamtwert von 5400 Euro. Jury­koor­dina­tor Univ.-Prof. Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Maurizio Musso von der Universität Salzburg betont: „Mit mittler­weile 5 Fachbereichen ist der Preis in diesem Jahr um eine Kategorie reicher, wobei für die Fach­jury der Universität Salzburg die engagierte Arbeit der jungen Talente immer eine neue Bereicher­ung ist.
    Dr.in Therese Wohlschlager wird am 25. September 2019 im Rahmen der 18. Österreichischen Chemietage 2019 in Linz mit dem Feigl Preis der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Analytische Chemie ausgezeichnet.
    Vom Arbeitsmarkt bis zur Zuwanderung. Wie haben sich in Österreich Einstellungen und Lebensformen in den letzten Jahrzehnten verändert? Das wird vom 26.- 28. September 2019 an der Universität Salzburg beim Kongress „Alles im Wandel? Dynamiken und Kontinuitäten moderner Gesellschaften“ eines der Schwerpunktthemen sein. Veranstaltet wird der Kongress von der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Soziologie.
    Wie schon für die jüngste Europawahl hat ein Team der Abteilung Politikwissenschaft der Universität Salzburg gemeinsam mit der Digital-Agentur MOVACT auch für die Nationalratswahl am 29. September ein digitales Wahlhilfe-Tool entworfen – den WahlSwiper.
    Um Studienanfänger*innen den Einstieg ins Studium zu erleichtern, bietet die Universität Salzburg in der letzten Septemberwoche den Orientierungstag an. An diesem Tag erhalten Studienanfänger*innen Informationen über zentrale Einrichtungen unserer Universität rund um Studium, Einführung in die IT-Infrastruktur und vieles mehr.
    Holz-/Linolschnitte und Ölmalerei • Franz Glanzner
    Wichtige Termine und Informationen zur Anmeldung für die Kurse am Sprachenzentrum im Wintersemester 2019/20
    Am Dienstag, dem 1. Oktober 2019 findet um 17.15 Uhr im HS 3.348 (Unipark, 3. Stock, Fachbereich Romanistik) eine Info-Veranstaltung statt, die sich in erster Linie an alle Neuinskribierten des Masterstudiums richtet. Darüber hinaus sind aber auch alle anderen Studierenden des Fachs sowie sonstige Interessierte herzlich eingeladen.
    Die Universitätsbibliothek Salzburg (Hauptbibliothek und Fakultätsbibliothek für Rechtswissenschaften) öffnet Tür und Tor für die Öffentlichkeit und bietet ein vielfältiges Programm.
    Karl-Markus Gauß liest für sozial benachteiligte Kinder in Rumänien. Der Salzburger Schriftsteller Karl-Markus Gauß setzt sich seit Jahrzehnten mit dem Leben der Roma in Osteuropa auseinander. Im Dialog mit Michael König, Geschäftsführer des Diakoniewerks Salzburg, spricht er an diesem Abend über seine Erfahrungen.
    Die Salzburger Armenologin Jasmine Dum-Tragut eröffnet am 31. August 2019 im Genozid-Museum in Jerewan die erste Ausstellung, die das Schicksal armenischer Kriegsgefangener in den österreichischen Gefangenenlagern im Ersten Weltkrieg zeigt.
    In einer spannend besetzten Veranstaltung diskutieren Markus Hinterhäuser/Intendant der Salzburger Festspiele und Christophe Slagmuylder/Intendant der Wiener Festwochen unter Moderation von Dorothea von Hantelmann/Professorin am Bard College Berlin, über das „Festival Kuratieren Heute“
    Mit dem Thema ESG Regulierung – Auswirkungen des EU Aktionsplans kommt das Impact Forum Europe bereits zum sechsten Mal nach Salzburg.
    Demokratie und Rechtsstaat scheinen in Europa schon bessere Zeiten erlebt zu haben. Die jüngsten Entwicklungen in vielen Staaten weisen auf einen Abbau von Rechtsstaatlichkeit, Grundrechten und Demokratie hin.
  • Veranstaltungen
  • 24.09.19 Orientierungstag für Erstsemestrige
    25.09.19 Orientierungstag für Erstsemestrige
    25.09.19 Dr. Brigitta Elsässer Venia: „Organische Chemie“
    25.09.19 Wenn die E-Gitarre lacht... Taschenopernfestival 2019 "Salzburg liegt am Meer"
    26.09.19 Orientierungstag für Erstsemestrige
    26.09.19 Tagung für Praktische Philosophie
    26.09.19 Holz-/Linolschnitte und Ölmalerei • Franz Glanzner
  • Alumni Club
  • PRESSE
  • Uni-Shop
  • VERANSTALTUNGSRÄUME
  • STELLENMARKT
  • Facebook-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Twitter-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Instagram-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Flickr-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Vimeo-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg