Anders Nes

Strong Phenomenal Intentionality versus the Holism of Non-Demonstrative Inference

Diverse contemporary philosophers of mind follow Brentano in affirming a close connection between intentionality and consciousness. An influential subset of such philosophers, including such naturalists as Tye, Dretske, and Lycan, seek to explain (phenomenal) consciousness in terms of notions of intentionality they see as prior to, and independent of, consciousness. However, recently, a converse (and surely more Brentanian) approach has been gathering steam, according to which the notion of intentionality is at least coeval with that of consciousness, an approach lately dubbed the ‘Phenomenal Intentionality Research Programme’ (Krigel forthcoming) What I term ‘Strong Phenomenal Intentionality’ (SPI) holds all intentional states to be phenomenally conscious (a view defended by Georgalis 2006 and Strawson 2008), or, if they are not phenomenally conscious, to exemplify ‘second-class’ forms of intentionality, in that they are interpretation-dependent (Kriegel 2011), somehow inferential shadows of phenomenal states (Horgan and Graham forthcoming), or derivative in some other way upon phenomenal states. (See Kriegel forthcoming: 19-20 for discussion). SPI, I shall argue, confronts a challenge over the holistic character of non-demonstrative inference. The reasonability of most of our inferences, in both theoretical and practical reasoning, depends on vast tracts of background knowledge, or background assumptions. This is brought out in what Carnap (1950), Hempel (1960), and most subsequent theorists of non-deductive reasoning have accepted under the name of the ‘Requirement of Total Evidence’ (RTE). As T. Kelly (2006) recently has put it: “In order to be justified in believing some proposition then, it is not enough that that proposition be well-supported by some proper subset of one´s total evidence; rather, what is relevant is how well-supported the proposition is by one´s total evidence.” Fodor´s (1983) discussion of the holistic, apparently unencapsulated nature of belief fixation touches on closely related themes. On plausible assumptions about what it takes for some evidence to be available to some subject (and so be part of her total evidence), SPI in conjunction with RTE implies that the reasonability of a non-demonstrative inference is relative, at most, to the totality of the phenomenally conscious states of the subject, or, in so far as there are exceptions to this, that these exceptions are due to second-class intentional states. This implication, I argue, is not plausible. The reasonability of our non-demonstrative inferences pervasively depends on vast stocks of knowledge or belief that is merely preconscious, in the Freudian sense, or access but not phenomenally conscious, in Block’s (1995).

For example, suppose I´m walking past a café in Salzburg, and decide to walk in and order a cappuccino. In making this decision, I assumed the café had a floor to walk on, that it serves cappuccinos safe for human consumption, that the people behind the counter would treat me with a minimum of respect and so, e.g., not attack me but serve me, etc. etc. If I didn’t assume this, my forming of this intention would be quite unreasonable. However, it is not plausible to think that all of these assumptions somehow figured in my overall, occurrent phenomenally conscious state of mind at the time prior to entering. It might well be that, what was occupying my conscious awareness prior to forming my decision, were thoughts of the pleasures and benefits of getting a cappuccino, of the attractive woodwork on the walls and ceiling (as seen though the windows), some hopeful musings that some members of Camerata Salzburg (of which I´m a fan) surely must be regulars at a place like this, and some other vague reflections related to my touristy, stereotyped conception of Salzburg. If asked ’what was your mind´ immediately after making my decision, these are the things that would spring to my self-awareness. True, if asked ´Did you assume this café to have a floor safe to walk on?’ I would naturally reply ´Yes, of course´. But my grounds for affirming this question would be different in kind from my grounds for affirming ´Were you supposing this place would be quite likely to be frequented by members of the Camerata?’ The latter I could affirm because of some sort of vivid memory; the question about my assumption about the floor, in constrast, I answer in some different way. Drawing on Bretano´s (1874/1973: 22-27) discussion of ´inner perception´ and its relation to memory, I argue this is evidence that my background assumptions about the floor etc. (in contrast to my thoughts about the woodwork, the Camerata, etc.) are not phenomenal states.

These considerations do not, as they stand, disprove the more qualified form of SPI according to which I do have the alleged, non-phenomenal background assumptions, but that these are somehow second-class examples of intentionality. I end by arguing against some versions of this qualified form of SPI, notably the construal of such states as interpretation-dependent, proposed by Kriegel (2011). I note that this view has the implication that the reasonability of my (phenomenally conscious) decision to visit the cafe is also an interpretation-dependent matter. If so, the power of this phenomenal state to make other intentional states reasonable – for example, leading me to form a decision to find the entrance – is also interpretation-dependent. These implications are not attractive, I argue. Moreover, at least some of the non-phenomenal background assumptions play as causal role in making me form the relevant intention, and do so in a content-sensitive way. By appeal to the classical Cartesian idea that there can be no less reality in the cause than in the effect, I conclude we should not take an interpretationist – and so, in broad terms, a projectivist – view of such non-phenomenal states, if we do not take if of such phenomenally conscious intentional states as my decision to visit the cafe. Brentano, F. (1874/1973) Psychology from Empirical Standpoint . Edited by O. Kraus. English edition L. L. McAlister, ed. Translated by A. C. Rancurello, D. B. Terrell, and L. L. McAlister. Routledge. Carnap, R. (1950) The Logical Foundations of Probability. Chicago University Press. Georgalis , N . (2006) The Primacy of the Subjective . Cambridge MA : MIT Press . Hempel, C. (1960). “Inductive Inconsistencies”, Synthese 12: 439-469. Horgan , T . and G. Graham Forthcoming . “Phenomenal Intentionality and Content Determinacy.” In R. Schantz , Prospects for Meaning . Amsterdam : de Gruyter. Kriegel, U. (2011) The Sources of Intentionality. OUP. Kriegel, U. (forthcoming) "The Phenomenal Intentionality Research Program", Phenomenal Intentionality: New Essays, OUP. Accessed from <http://uriahkriegel.com/downloads/PIRP.pdf>, 1.12.2012 Strawson , G . 2008 . “Real Intentionality 3: Why Intentionality Entails Consciousness.” In his Real Materialism and Other Essays . OUP.

  • ENGLISH English
  • News
    Die frühere Standard-Chefredakteurin und jetzige Israel-Korrespondentin für die Süddeutsche Zeitung Alexandra Föderl-Schmid präsentiert ihr aktuelles Buch „Unfassbare Wunder“, in dem sie 24 Gespräche mit Holocaust-Überlebenden in Deutschland, Österreich und Israel aufgezeichnet hat. Dienstag, 28. Mai, 19.00 Uhr, Max Gandolph Bibliothek der Universität Salzburg.
    Die Universität Salzburg hat in 2019 unter der Führung des Europäischen Hochschulinstituts in Florenz an euandi (EU-and-I) mitgearbeitet, eine paneuropäische Onlinewahlhilfe, die europäische Bürgerinnen und Bürger einen Überblick über die politischen Positionen der nationalen Parteien in den 28 Mitgliedstaaten ermöglicht.
    Am 27. 4. verstarb Ass. Prof. i. R. Dr. Reinhard Rublack. Reinhard Rublack kam noch in der Pionierphase der Universität Salzburg als absolvierter Theologe (Studium u. a. bei Rudolf Bultmann) mit Professor Rudolf Gönner aus Saarbrücken an das (damalige) Institut für Pädagogik. Bereits 1970 vollendete er sein Zweitstudium mit der interdisziplinär angelegten geisteswissenschaftlichen Dissertation über „Die bildungspolitische Tendenz des ‚Salzburger Intelligenzblattes‘ 1784 – 1806.“
    Im Herbst vergangenen Jahres hat unsere Universität das Audit "hochschuleundfamilie" durchlaufen. Im Jänner wurden wir von der Bundesministerin für Frauen, Familien und Jugend, Dr. Juliane Bogner-Strauß, als familienfreundliche Hochschule ausgezeichnet.
    In Kooperation mit der Universität Freiburg bringt die Universität Salzburg für die bevorstehende Europawahl erstmals die digitale Wahlhilfe "WahlSwiper" nach Österreich.
    Der Kurt-Zopf-Förderpreis 2018 wurde gestern Mittwoch, dem 24. April 2019 an den Pflanzenökologen Stefan Dötterl, den Schlafforscher Manuel Schabus und an den Mathematiker Wolfgang Trutschnig vergeben. Die Salzburger Wissenschaftler erhalten für herausragende Publikationen jeweils 5.000,- Euro Preisgeld.
    Der Botanische Garten lädt ein zu einer kostenlosen Führung! Treffpunkt: Eingang zum Botanischen Garten. Dauer: ca. eine Stunde. Die Führung findet bei jedem Wetter statt. Botanischer Garten, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34.
    International Workshop - HARTMUT STÖCKL & JANA PFLAEGING - English & Applied Linguistics / Department of English and American Studies - 23 and 24 May 2019 - UniPark Nonntal 1.009
    PD Dr. Dominik Martin-Creuzburg hält am 24. Mai 2019 um 14:00 Uhr im Hörsaal 421 der NW-Fakultät einen Vortrag zum Thema "Essential lipids in aquatic food webs: nutritional requirements, physiological constraints, and trophic transfer". Der Fachbereich Biowissenschaften lädt herzlich dazu ein!
    Dank einer großzügigen Hinterlassenschaft seitens Herrn Kurt Zopf schreibt die Universität Salzburg den mit 10.000,-- Euro dotierten Kurt-Zopf-Förderpreis für habilitierte Angehörige von Organisationseinheiten der Universität, welche die Fachgebiete Geistes-, Kultur- und/oder Sozialwissenschaft, Rechtswissenschaft oder Theologie umfassen, aus.
    Mit Alexandra Föderl Schmid, Israel-Korrespondentin der Süddeutschen Zeitung, und Marko Feingold, Präsident der Israelitischen Kultusgemeinde Salzburg, anlässlich seines 106. Geburtstags.
    Was ist ein gelungenes Leben? Die Begegnung mit der tot geglaubten, unkonventionellen Großmutter, die in einem verborgenen Haus mitten im Wald lebt, bringt einer jungen Frau unerwartete Erkenntnisse, die ihr Leben auf den Kopf stellen. (Picus Verlag)
    Es ist wieder so weit, am 29. Mai 2019 findet das Konzert des Universitätsorchesters für dieses Semester statt. Wir freuen uns auf Sie und ein tolles Programm!
    22. MAI: Marco RISPOLI (Padua): Zwischen Öffentlichkeit und Intimität: HEINES Federkriege // 29. MAI: Dirk ROSE (Innsbruck): „Ich bin Dynamit“ - NIETZSCHE als Polemiker // ÖFFENTLICHE RINGVORLESUNG // 6. März bis 26. Juni 2019, jeweils am Mittwoch um 18.00-19.30h im Unipark Nonntal // www.w-k.sbg.ac.at/de/kunstpolemik
    Gastvortrag Alte Geschichte, Altertumskunde und Mykenologie, Eine Stadt voller Stelen. Die Topographie der athenischen Inschriften, Dr. Irene Berti Pädagogische Hochschule Heidelberg, Montag, 3. Juni 2019, 18.30 Uhr s.t. Residenzplatz 1/4, SR. 1.42
    Der Botanische Garten lädt ein zu einer kostenlosen Führung! Treffpunkt: Eingang zum Botanischen Garten. Dauer: ca. eine Stunde. Die Führung findet bei jedem Wetter statt. Botanischer Garten, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34.
    06.06. Katharina PRAGER: Der Zeitkämpfer KARL KRAUS – polemische und satirische Praktiken in der Ersten Republik // 12.06. Uta DEGNER: Literatur als „Kampfgas“. Polemik als produktives Prinzip bei ELFRIEDE JELINEK // 19.06. Daniel FULDA: Polemik im Dienst der guten Sache? ROBERT MENASSES Hallstein-Zitate und der Streit über die europäische Einigung // 26.06. Herwig GOTTWALD: Der Kampf um die Gesinnungsästhetik. CHRISTA WOLF und der deutsch-deutsche Literaturaturstreit
    32. Tagung des Forums Friedenspsychologie zum Thema „Flucht, Migration, Fremdenfeindlichkeit und Rassismus“, 14.–16.06.2019, Universität Salzburg, Unipark Nonntal
    Das Weiterbildungsangebot für engagierte Pädagog/innen und Interessierte im neuen kompakten Tagungsformat in der Großen Universitätsaula Salzburg. Jetzt anmelden und aktiv erfahren, wie Sie Geborgenheit für Kinder und Jugendliche spürbar machen!
  • Veranstaltungen
  • 23.05.19 Praxisseminar Sozialversicherung - 15 Jahre Verordnung 883/2004 - aktuelle Fragen
    23.05.19 Some Diophantine problems connected to binary recurrences
    23.05.19 Joshua Bell und Andrew Manze
    23.05.19 Shona Skulpturen, Kunst aus Simbabwe im Botanischen Garten
    23.05.19 On defensive thoughts and hostile actions - How motivated processes within and between groups may help explain the rise of populist parties, the “refugee crisis”, and “alternative facts”
    23.05.19 Vortrag: "Good people or good laws - Philosophy and the fight against corruption in Kenya"
    23.05.19 Moderne Forensische Sprecher-Erkennung: Speech Science im Dienst von Polizei und Justiz
    24.05.19 Essential lipids in aquatic food webs: nutritional requirements, physiological constraints, and trophic transfer
    26.05.19 Streifzug durch den Garten
    26.05.19 Shona Skulpturen, Kunst aus Simbabwe im Botanischen Garten
    28.05.19 Romanlesung mit Thomas Sautner „Großmutters Haus“
    29.05.19 Personalisierung und Digitalisierung als Beispiele aktueller Trends in der Psychotherapieforschung
    29.05.19 „Ich bin Dynamit“ – Nietzsche als Polemiker
    29.05.19 Sprachwandel R/Evolution von unsichtbarer Hand ?
    29.05.19 Konzert des Universitätsorchesters Salzburg
  • Alumni Club
  • PRESSE
  • Uni-Shop
  • VERANSTALTUNGSRÄUME
  • STELLENMARKT
  • Facebook-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Twitter-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Instagram-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Flickr-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg Vimeo-Auftritt der Universität Salzburg